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Story of Aqa who lost wife, daughter to SC attack

Story of Aqa who lost wife, daughter to SC attack

By
On
Feb 08, 2017 - 19:58

KABUL (Pajhwok): A young man, who lost his wife and daughter to yesterday’s suicide attack on the Supreme Court premises in Kabul, on Wednesday asked why his beloved ones were killed.

Jan Aqa, 30, a resident of Nijrab district of central Kapisa province, is currently living in Khwaja Rawash area of Kabul. He told Pajhwok Afghan News the suicide attack outside the Supreme Court gate destroyed his life.

“My wife had taken our 14-year-old daughter to a clinic for treatment in Macrorayan area, but the blast hit them returning,” he said.

He said their second daughter, younger from the dead one, was walking with her mother and was seriously injured in the incident. She was currently in coma.

Aqa, while shedding tears, said, “Oh God, I don’t know for how long the innocents will die and the bloodshed continue, who one hears our voice.”

While crying over the coffins of his wife and daughter, he said: “My home in the village has been destroyed and no more hope in my life remains.”

He said his 28-year-old wife was the only breadwinner of their family. She would  wash clothes at people’s homes to earn some money.

About his daughter killed in the incident, Aqa said: “Nida was in eighth grade at the Bibi Mehro High School, she was a talented girl and always hoped to become a doctor, but all her hopes were buried with her in grave.”

The jobless man said he was ill and had recently returned from Iran. He even could not afford treatment of his injured daughter who had sustained shrapnel wounds in the stomach.

Bismillah, a neighbor of Aqa, said the government must prevent such deadly attacks. He believed most victims of such attacks were innocent and poor people.

“In the past, people were killed by blindly fired rockets and now suicide bombers kill people in every part of the country. Vegetable sellers, laborers, workers and even school going children are not spared in suicide attacks,” he said.

Mehrsahd, the only son of Aqa, said: “I stopped attending school due to our poor economy and now as my beloved mother and sister had been killed, our lives are destroyed.”

The mother of Aqa also expressed similar feelings. “Our sorrows and sufferings have no end. I lost one of my sons to a similar attack eight years ago, his wife and their eight children have been without a caretaker, and now I lost daughter in law. My second son’s life is destroyed.”

“My this son is very poor and he was living with his wife and children in a rented house, we don’t know what sins they had committed to be killed,” she said in a sad voice.

Jan Aqa is not alone to mourn the death of his relatives. There are dozens of other people who lost their beloved ones to Tuesday’s attack.

Ismail Kawosi, a spokesman to the Ministry of Public Health (MoPH), said 21 Supreme Court officers and civilians were killed and 45 others injured in the suicide attack.

No groups has so far asserted responsibility for the incident.

A recent UN report recorded an unprecedented spike in civilian casualties in Afghanistan in 2016 compared to the previous years.

The report said 3,500 civilians were killed and more than 7,000 injured in different parts of the country last year.

mds/ma